Changing the Game Project: Looking for Answers? FREE Booklet With Links to Our Most Popular Articles for Parents, Coaches, Athletes and Youth Sports Organizations

source: http://changingthegameproject.com/looking-answers-comprehensive-booklet-popular-articles-parents-coaches-athletes-youth-sports-organizations/

 

Here at Changing the Game Project, every week we get a call or email that says “remember that article you wrote about…? We want to use it in our newsletter and we can’t find it. What was it called?” Well, after four years of publishing thousands of words a month, we have realized that we sometimes cannot even find the articles we are looking for. Therefore, we developed a comprehensive resource guide as a way for you (and to be honest, us!) to easily find the articles you need to save you time and energy and keep you doing what you do best – coaching, parenting, playing sports, or running your organization. Below you will find links to the top 5 articles in each category so you can get started, as well as share this page with the coaches, parents and youth sports organizations in your life. Also, you can grab the entire booklet of every article we have ever published here (it’s only 4 pages, just title links)

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD OUR BOOKLET CONTAINING LINKS TO ALL OUR BLOG POSTS IN ONE PLACE!

How to Use The Guide: The guide is organized into five sections: Parents, Coaches, Athletes, and Youth Sports Organizations/Schools/Clubs and Book Recommendations. Obviously, some of the articles pertain to multiple categories, so feel free to peruse each category for headlines that interest you. As new articles come out we will update to keep it as current as possible.

Our hope is you will use this guide as a means to share a better experience with your friends and colleagues and continue to help us spread the resources for Changing the Game Project. If you are a Coach, link to helpful articles in your emails to parents or athletes. Parents, share articles about specialization, the ride home, and why kids quit with your friends. Send your athlete an inspiring article. Clubs, you can share an article or two to prompt discussion prior to a board meeting or AGM.  You could create a series of articles sent, add it to your website, or create study tracks that are required as continuing education. The information is all here in a categorized and hyperlinked format. Feel free to get creative with how you use it, and let us know what you do and how it is working.

Finally, while most of these articles have been written by John O’Sullivan, we have received some outstanding guest contributions over the years, and we want to thank writers such as James Leath, Reed Maltbie, and others for sharing their work with us.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD OUR BOOKLET CONTAINING LINKS TO ALL OUR BLOG POSTS IN ONE PLACE!

Good luck!

Top 5 Articles for Parents 

The Race to Nowhere in Youth Sports

How Adults Take the Joy out of Sports (And How We Can Fix It)

Why Kids Quit Sports

Is It Wise To Specialize

The Ride Home

Top 5 Articles for Coaches 

Are Great Coaches Becoming an Endangered Species?

The Adultification of Youth Sports

The Missing Ingredient in Talent Development

Our Biggest Mistake Talent Selection Instead of Talent Identification

Youth Sports Coaching: Not a Job but a Calling

Top 5 Articles for Athletes 

The One Quality Great Teammates Have in Common

More Important Than Talent

The Difference Between Winning and Losing

Dear Potential Recruit: Your Talent Only Gets You So Far

Life Lessons from my “Old School” Sports Dad

Top 5 Articles for Administrators/Organizations/Clubs/Governing Bodies 

Changing the Game in Youth Sports

Raising the Bar in Youth Sports

The Accountability Problem in Youth Sports

Is Your Child’s Youth Sports Experience Transactional or Transformational?

What is Your Club’s D.N.A?

Recommended Reading

Our 2016 Books of the Year

Our 2015 Books of the Year

Our 2014 Books of the Year

Our 2013 Books of the Year

Our All-Time Favorite Books

When Will What We Know Change What We Do in Youth Sports?

source: http://changingthegameproject.com/will-know-change/

 

“My daughter and I had to miss her grandfather’s funeral when she was 12 for a cheerleading competition.”

I had to read that twice to be sure what I was reading. This was an actual comment we received recently on Facebook. We receive a lot of heartbreaking stories from readers, but this one sentence stopped me in my tracks. The mere thought that the funeral of a parent would play second fiddle to a 12-year-old cheerleading competition simply boggles the mind.

We hear incredible tales of missed family events, as well as coaches ordering players to skip siblings weddings and other life events. We hear of injuries that used to only occur in college age players now occurring weekly in kids as young as age 12. We hear about families forced to choose between supporting their child’s emotional and psychological well-being or allowing them to continue playing high-level sports for an unaccountable, bully coach. But missing a funeral took the cake.

“When will what we know change what we do?”

This was a question posed on a call the other day with the Quality Coaching Collective, a first of its kind group of dynamic authors, speakers, researchers and coaches from across the globe that I am honored to be a part of. All of us on the call work everyday to shift the paradigm in youth sports and physical literacy. We work with organizations to make the changes to their mission, values, coaching and accountability to make sports more user friendly for the kids involved. The question we all ask ourselves is this:

Why doesn’t science, research and coaching best practices drive our youth sports model?

Sadly, it’s because youth sports and physical movement education have become, in far too many cases, more about the needs of the business of sport than the needs of the child in sport. When over 70% of kids quit sports before high school, it is their way of telling us that this model is not working for them.

It is time for what we know to change how we do things in youth sports.

We know that playing multiple sports and getting adequate rest and time off is a key component to preventing injury and burnout.(click here for American Society for Sports Medicine position statement). We also know that in many sports less specialization prior to the teenage years is a greater predictor of elite level performance. Sadly, what we do is continually force children to specialize far too young, increasing the dropout rate and resulting in an up to 70-90% higher injury rate according to this recent study by Neeru Jayanthi.

What we know is that autonomy, enjoyment and intrinsic motivation are critical components of long-term sport performance, according to researcher Joe Baker, author of the critically acclaimed book Developing Sport Expertise. What we do, all too often, is take these away from kids. We limit a child’s ability to try many sports by forcing him or her to choose one far too early. We focus on outcomes (did you win?) instead of enjoyment (are you having fun?). As a result we prevent kids from developing the intrinsic motivation to continually improve, and to be driven to succeed without us having to even ask.

What we know is that a coach’s words can leave a lasting impact on a young athlete. A coach’s influence is never neutral! We must be intentional about everything we say and do with kids. Sadly, what we all too often do is allow coaches to treat young athletes in a way that we would never allow a teacher to treat a child. We allow poorly trained and behaved coaches to continue to work with kids, even after numerous incidents of poor behavior, because they win a few games. We allow coaches who are demeaning under the guise of being demanding. And, as author Jennifer Fraser found in her great book Teaching Bullies, we even ostracize the children and parents who try and stand up to coaches who treat others poorly.

What we know is that no young athlete says “I love it when I can hear my dad yelling at the officials.” We know that the vast majority of kids, when asked “what would you like your parents to say on the sideline of your games, emphatically say “NOTHING!” What we do is attend our children’s games, coach them on every play (“Pass, shoot, hustle!”) and disrespect officials, often over inconsequential calls. Then we become outraged when children disrespect other authority figures in their lives and ponder “where did they learn that?” Spend a weekend on the sports field. Kids hear what we say, but they imitate what we do.

What we know is that research says the #1 reason athletes play is “FUN!” Though an 8-year old might have a different definition of fun (learning new things, being with my friends) than an 18-year-old (being pushed to be my best, high-intensity competition), they still speak to the importance of enjoyment. What we do too often is take the “play” out of playing sports, and say “we are here to work.” Kids don’t work sports; they play them.

What we know is that randomized, games-based learning promotes creativity, decision making, assessment and more transferability to competition. What far too many coaches still do, unfortunately, is promote blocked/massed practice, endlessly repeating the same technique over and over to “get our touches in.” It’s not that this doesn’t have some effect, simply that it’s about the least effective way to make use of your limited team training time.

What we know is that clubs who follow a proper athletic development model, and craft a mission statement and values focused on developing the person, not simply the athlete, will create more loyalty and greater player retention than those who do not. What we often see are organizations that pay lip service to child development and values, and do not hold parents, coaches and athletes accountable for upholding those values. What a huge abdication of responsibility and lost opportunity to really make an impact on kids.

What we know is that sport development is all about the process and long term focus. There are no overnight successes. Failure and adversity are all part of the process and focus on excellence. Sadly, what we do is operate out of fear. We get caught up in short term outcomes (did we win this weekend?) vs the focus on continuous improvement (what did we learn from losing that will help us get better?).

Finally, and most importantly, what we know is that what our children need most, after a tough game, is something to eat and to know that we love watching them compete and play. They don’t need a critical recap on the ride home. They don’t need their coach’s decisions questioned, or teammates criticized. Just love them, unconditionally, and take into account their state of mind before you offer up your thoughts on how to get better.

When will what we know change what we do?

How long can we keep ignoring the research and evidence on sporting best practices?

Change will happen when great parents and coaches stand up and build youth sport organizations and school programs that serve the needs of the kids. Change will happen when the silent majority take a stand against the vocal minority of adults who care more about the bottom line than the welfare of children.

Change will only happen one family, one club and one town at a time. As author Carl Safina writes, “one doesn’t wait for a revolution. One becomes it.”

Let’s align what we know and what we do. Our kids deserve it.

WOC #15 Julie Foudy, Two-Time World Cup Champion and ESPN Analyst, on Choosing to Matter

source: http://changingthegameproject.com/woc-15-julie-foudy-two-time-world-cup-champion-espn-analyst-choosing-matter/

 

ulie Foudy is a two-time FIFA Women’s World Cup champion and Olympic gold medalist. She played for the United States women’s national soccer team from 1987–2004. Foudy finished her international career with 271 caps and served as the team’s captain from 2000–2004 as well as the co-captain from 1991–2000. In 1997, she was the first American and first woman to receive the FIFA Fair Play Award.

 

From 2000–2002, Foudy served as president of the Women’s Sports Foundation. In 2006, she co-founded the Julie Foudy Sports Leadership Academy, an organization focused on developing leadership skills in teenage girls. In 2007, she was inducted into the National Soccer Hall of Fame with her teammate, Mia Hamm. She is currently an analyst, reporter and the primary color commentator for women’s soccer telecasts on ESPN.

Foudy is the author of Choose to Matter: Being Courageously and Fabulously YOU and appeared in the HBO documentary Dare to Dream: The Story of the U.S. Women’s Soccer Team.

 

Subscribe to the Way of Champions Podcast on iTunes

Show Notes

6:15     What she has noticed about even the most confident woman

9:00     Leadership isn’t Positional it is Personal

14:45   When did Joy and Winning become mutually exclusive

20:00   Julie’s qualities of the best coaches

23:45   On Anson Dorrance – Loyalty is gained through love, not fear

31:15   Greatness doesn’t happen overnight – “don’t get stuck in your junk”

34:30   What Julie discovered about herself after writing her book

37:15   Julie’s final thoughts for parents, coaches, athletes

 

Finding Julie

Twitter – @JulieFoudy

Facebook – JulieFoudy

Website – www.juliefoudyleadership.com

Julie’s Book – Choose to Matter on Amazon

WOC #11 Jon Gordon, Best Selling Author and Leadership Expert, on The Power of Positivity

source: http://changingthegameproject.com/woc-11-jon-gordon-best-selling-author-leadership-expert-power-positivity/

 

Jon Gordon’s best-selling books and talks have inspired readers and audiences around the world. His principles have been put to the test by numerous Fortune 500 companies, professional and college sports teams, school districts, hospitals, and non-profits. He is the author of 17 books including 5 best-sellers: The Energy Bus, The Carpenter, Training Camp, You Win in the Locker Room First and The Power of Positive Leadership. Jon and his tips have been featured on The Today Show, CNN, CNBC, The Golf Channel, Fox and Friends and in numerous magazines and newspapers. His clients include The Los Angeles Dodgers, The Atlanta Falcons, Campbell Soup, Dell, Publix, Southwest Airlines, LA Clippers, Miami Heat, Pittsburgh Pirates, BB&T Bank, Clemson Football, Northwestern Mutual, Bayer, West Point Academy and more.

Jon is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters in Teaching from Emory University. He and his training/consulting company are passionate about developing positive leaders, organizations and teams.

Finding Jon:
Jon on Twitter
Jon on Facebook
Jon on Instagram
Jon’s Website
Jon’s Books on Amazon: Jon’s Amazon Page

Subscribe to Way of Champions Podcast on iTunes

Show Notes:
7:00 Jon’s Transformation Through Positivity
9:00 The Energy Bus
12:30 The Story Behind The Hard Hat
16:00 You Win in the Locker Room First
21:00 Why Positvity Changes the World
24:45 Dabo’s Safe Seat
31:30 How to Create a More Positive Team Environment
36:45 Final Thoughts and How to Find Jon Gordon

WOC #13 Nicole LaVoi, Co-Director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport

source: http://changingthegameproject.com/woc-13-nicole-lavoi-co-director-of-the-tucker-center-for-research-on-girls-and-women-in-sport/

 

Author of Women in Sports Coaching, Nicole M. LaVoi, Ph.D. is a Senior Lecturer in the area of social and behavioral sciences in the School of Kinesiology at the University of Minnesota where she is also the Co-Director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, and the co-founder of the Minnesota Youth Sport Research Consortium. She received MA (’96) and doctoral degrees (’02) in Kinesiology with an emphasis in sport psychology/sociology from the University of Minnesota. After completing her graduate work, Dr. LaVoi was a Research & Program Associate in the Mendelson Center for Sport & Character at the University of Notre Dame (2002-‘05) where she helped launch the Play Like a Champion character education through sport series, and was also an instructor in the Psychology Department. LaVoi was an Assistant Professor of Physical Education and the Head Women’s Tennis Coach at Wellesley College (1994-’98), and the Assistant Women’s Tennis Coach at Carleton College (1991-’93).

Subscribe to the Way of Champions Podcast on iTunes


Show Notes

5:00 When she became interested in issues for Women in Sport Leadership?
8:00 Why is there a decline in women in sport leadership?
15:00 What would it take to get more women coaching sports?
21:00 Why does Nicole think kids are quitting sport?
28:00 Nicole explains “background anger” and how it affects children
35:00 What is Kid Speak?
48:00 Winning and Character Development are not mutually exclusive

Get in Touch with Dr. LaVoi

On Twitter: @DrSportPsych @TuckerCenter
Her Website: The Tucker Center
Her book – Women In Sports Coaching

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